THE CITY OF HUNTINGTON’S 150TH ANNIVERSARY
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Housing Rehabilitation Assistance

Veterans Health Administration

The Veterans Health Administration has the Home Improvement and Structural Alterations (HISA) grant program which helps veterans in modifying their home to assist with access. The dollar amount for HISA is based on the veteran’s service connected disability. With the HISA grant, the Veterans Health Administration can provide permanent ramps (wood or concrete), walk-in showers, door widening, handrails and several other things depending on the veterans medical condition. The first step in applying for the HISA grant is the need for the veteran to discuss this with their VA provider and request a referral for a HISA evaluation. We must have a referral from a VA provider to start the process. In the event the veteran has exhausted their HISA benefit we may be able to provide an aluminum ramp, again the veteran must have a referral from their VA provider for a wheelchair ramp.

The Veterans Health Administration has a Home Improvement and Structural Alterations (HISA)

The HISA grant is a lifetime benefit and cannot exceed $6,800 for service-connected veterans and $2,000 for non-service-connected veterans. This program is available to veterans to assist in structural alterations or home improvements necessary to provide access to the home or essential bathroom facilities.

Southwestern Community Action Weatherization Program

The Weatherization Assistance Program was created in 1976 to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, especially low-income persons who are particularly vulnerable such as:

  • Elderly

  • Persons with disabilities

  • Families with Children

  • High residential energy users

  • Households with high energy burden

USDA offers a grant/loan program for housing repairs

504 Single Family Repair Loans and Grants Purpose of the Program: • To provide direct loan and/or grant funds to very-low income applicants who do not qualify for conventional bank financing, for the repair of their dwelling.  Grant funds may be used to pay costs of repairs or improvements which are identified health or safety hazards.

Habitat for Humanity of the Tri-State offers a homeownership program dependent on eligibility and applicants must provide sweat equity.

Habitat for Humanity offers homeownership opportunities to families who are unable to obtain conventional housing financing.  Generally, this includes those whose income is 30 to 60 percent of the area’s median income.  In most cases, prospective Habitat homeowner families make a $500 down payment.  Additionally, they contribute 250 to 450 hours of “sweat equity” on the construction of their home or someone else’s home.  Because Habitat houses are built using donations of land, material and labor, mortgage payments are kept affordable.